U.S. Succeeds to Genetically Modify Human Embryos for The First Time Ever

The popular CRISPR focuses on genome editing. Their goal is to eliminate the diseases we inherit and cure cancer.

Recently, though, they started experimenting on human embryos. As controversial as it sounds, these trials are still ongoing. However, according to rumors, these embryos can’t survive the pregnancy.

Genome Editing on Human Embryos

In 2016, a Swedish team was the first to use this method on healthy human embryos. This trial was immediately canceled after two weeks.

Furthermore, there is even a rumor that the Chinese also participate in similar such experiments.

On top of that, the MIT Technology Review claim that an American team has also joined. According to their team’s first tests, giving birth to CRISPR babies is within our reach. However, there is no peer-review journal yet.

But, there are no reports that prove the CRISPR embryos face any genetic problems during the procedure. These problems are still unknown to us.

Researchers from the OHSU in Portland changed the DNA of one-cell human embryos with CRISPR. So, this technique has a chance to cure our genetic problems and improve our way of life.

Importantly, these embryos were terminated before they could grow into a fetus. Though, experimenting on embryos is not as controversial as experimenting on living human beings.

What is controversial for people is the ability to design their ideal baby, even choose the hair, eye, skin color or intelligence. Because of the genome editing, these embryos can be called ‘’designer babies’’.

Even though genome editing should be used only curing serious illnesses; people will use it for other purposes. Imagine if we can easily cure any life-threatening disease?

The frightening reality proves that people never change. Whatever happens, we will always find a way to use it to our advantage. At the end, we are all striving for perfection.

It doesn’t matter what goal we are trying to reach, if there is an easy way to reach it, we will do whatever it takes to succeed.

Source IFL Science | MIT Technology Review